TIFFANY FLOOR LAMP MAKES $103,500 AT COTTONE AUCTION

. May 24, 2009

A beautiful Tiffany Studios maple leaf floor lamp, in excellent condition and with the original patina, sold for $103,500 at a multi-estate sale held Mar. 21 by Cottone Auctions.

The lamp, standing 64 inches tall, featured a signed base and a 22-inch shade (#1999). It was the top item of the 300 or so lots that crossed the block. About 300 people packed the Cottone Auctions gallery.

“We were quite pleased with the results of the March sale,” said Sam Cottone of Cottone Auctions. “Most of the items were fresh to the market and high quality, so we expected it was going to be a good auction. The better lots fetched high prices. The same was true at our Fine Antique Clock Auction, held April 25. At that event, 250 lots crossed the block and there was steady interest all day.”

The March 21 auction featured a wide array of lots, drawn from private homes and individuals. Included was Americana, clocks, music boxes, barometers, period furniture, lamps, art glass, pottery, fine art, silver, sculptures and decorative accessories. Online bidding was facilitated exclusively by Artfact.com. “We also had lots of phone and absentee bids, at both auctions,” Mr. Cottone remarked.

Following are additional highlights from the March 21 sale, held at Cotton Auctions’ spacious showroom, located at 120 Court Street in Geneseo, N.Y. (located just south of Rochester, and midway between Buffalo and Syracuse). All prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

Another Tiffany lamp did well. It was an “Indian Basket” example, 17 inches tall, with signed shade (#1586) and an original patinated bronze base, also signed (#536). The lamp boasted an original patina and gaveled for $46,000.

Also, a fine Handel jungle bird lamp, 23 inches tall, in excellent and clean condition, with no chips or touch-ups, brought $25,875. The shade was 17-3/4 inches in diameter.

A rare presentation watercooler, 17 inches tall and 15 inches in diameter, made by Tyler & Dillon of Albany, N.Y., for Loveland Paddock, realized $57,500. The 8-gallon watercooler was marked “L. Paddock,” with incised cobalt bird and flower decorations. Loveland Paddock was an early owner of the Mayhew Farm in Jefferson County, N.Y. He also founded the Bank of Watertown, N.Y., in 1839.

From the fine art category, the following works wowed the crowd:

• A signed winter landscape watercolor and gouache by Walter Launt Palmer (American, 1854-1932). The 20 inches by 24 inches painting made $34,500.

• An oil on wood still life of a glass of wine with fruit by Severin Roesen (American, 1815-1871), signed lower right, 12 inches by 16 inches, in original condition and frame, achieved $32,200.

• An original painting depicting farm animals by Eugene Verboeckhoven (Belgian, 1798-1881), 14 inches by 20 inches, in excellent untouched condition, hammered for $27,600.

• An oil on canvas rendering of five baby chicks by Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (American, 1819-1905), signed lower right, 8 inches by 12 inches, in original frame and condition, coasted to $13,800.

Fine period furniture was served up in abundance. Top earners included a Limberts oak one-door cabinet, possibly with original finish ($13,570); a set of three walnut George Nakashima nesting tables, in original condition ($8,740); a Nakashima bench, 46 inches long ($7,820); and a mahogany and flame birch Sheraton chest from the Seymour school in Boston, with a rich, deep patina ($7,705).

Rounding out the day’s top lots: a three-piece bronze owl clock set (clock and two candelabras), 17 inches tall, in excellent condition, with porcelain numbers on dial and blown-glass eyes; ($9,200); a carved and painted cutlery tray with heart cut-out, canted sides and original wash, in nice condition ($6,325); and a carved maple Shaker dipper with the original cream paint, 6-1/2 inches long ($5,865).

Following are highlights from the Fine Antique Clock Auction, held April 25. Pieces were drawn from the lifelong collection of Dr. Roger Malebranche of Broadalbin, N.Y.; the collection of Harvey Schmidt of Flushing, N.Y.; an important North Carolina collection; and several other private collections from around the United States. All prices quoted include the 15 percent buyer’s premium.

A rare French mystery regulator – an advertising clock for the McLaughlin Store in Baltimore – rose to $20,700. The 41-inch-tall novelty clock, in excellent condition, featured an original patinated metal figure and 15-inch glass dial with original gold leaf Roman numerals. Also, a Waterbury #69 floor regulator in a carved oak case with applied carved decorations and fluted columns hit $14,950.

An E. Howard wall clock #42, 44 inches tall, in a carved and incised walnut case with fine old patina, professionally restored, with signed, painted original 8-inch metal dial, found a new owner for $12,650. Also, a Seth Thomas #7 wall regulator with carved and incised oak base in the original finish, 45 inches tall, with original, signed painted metal dial and original pendulum and weight, hit $12,535.

A rare early New York State shelf clock, with original maker’s label (Charles Platt, Beacon St., N.Y.), 47 inches tall, with 8-day time and strike and weight-driven brass movement, went for $10,350. Also, a fine Ithaca hanging Kildare wall calendar clock in a walnut case with carved crest and spindles, warm original finish, 8-inch black paper time dial and engraved crystal pendulum bob, brought $7,015.

A Henry Hart ¾ miniature shelf clock in a mahogany case with original stenciled columns and splat, a nice old finish and original painted wood dial made $7,015; an Atkins wagon spring shelf clock in a rosewood case with stenciled florals, in original finish, 16 inches tall, chalked up $5,175; and an Eli Terry pillar and scroll shelf clock, 31-1/2 inches tall, with original finish and finial, realized $5,060.

From the vintage barometers group, a rare Easton, Mass., barometer in a rosewood case with gilt metal mounts in the original finish, signed and engraved, 37-1/2 inches tall, hammered for $5,980. Also, a fine R. J. Beck barometer in a hand-carved cased with garlands, and having the original finish, with beveled front glass, signed and painted and measuring 45 inches tall, changed hands for $5,750.

Next up for Cottone Auctions will be a Fine Antique Gun Auction featuring the estate collection of John Wallace of Pavilion, N.Y.; and a Fine Clock Auction featuring the collection of Joe Butta of Larchmont, N.Y. The times and dates are yet to be announced. Watch the website for details: www.cottoneauctions.com.

The firm is accepting quality consignments for these and all future sales. To consign an item, estate or collection, you may call them at (585) 243-3100; or, you can e-mail them at scottone@rochester.rr.com.

To learn more about Cottone Auctions, log on to www.cottoneauctions.com.

Category: Antiques News

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